Sources

Bibliography (MLA)

1) “Energy Use at the University of Delaware.” University of Delaware Sustainability, The University of Delaware, sites.udel.edu/sustainability/energy/. Accessed 24 Apr. 2017.

2) Hoffman, Melody K. “Campuses Growing Greener.” Jet, vol. 117, no. 16, 19 Apr. 2010, p. 35. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspxdirect=true&db=8gh&AN=49467284&site=ehost-live.

3) Knox, Nora. “Green Building Costs and Savings.” USGBC, U.S. Green Building Council, 25 Mar. 2015, www.usgbc.org/articles/green-building-costs-and-savings. Accessed 24 Apr. 2017.

4) “Sustainability.” EPA, Environmental Protection Agency, 18 Oct. 2016, www.epa.gov/sustainability. Accessed 24 Apr. 2017.

5) Sutter, John, and Rachel Rodriguez. “COP21: 9 Questions for a Renewable Energy Expert.” CNN, Cable News Network, 10 Dec. 2015, www.cnn.com/2015/12/10/opinions/cop21-facebook-chat/. Accessed 24 Apr. 2017.

How I Use These Sources

Source #1 focuses on the University of Delaware’s plan to become more environmentally sustainable. According to this website, “in 2008, the University set a goal to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2020.” This information demonstrates that the University is taking steps towards becoming a “greener” campus, which leads to my argument that other colleges and uniLOGO-Sust-LG-108suqp.pngversities should follow in UD’s footsteps. Source #2 explains how more colleges are now offering sustainability degrees to students. According to this article, 200 colleges and universities across the nation currently offer a sustainability degree. In my paper, I use this information to argue that more colleges should offer sustainability degrees to students considering that there are over 5,000 colleges in the U.S. (200/5,000 = only 4%). I use source #3 to discredit the opposing side’s argument that converting buildings in an environmentally sustainable way is costlier than traditional building renovations. This is meant to show readers that I’ve acknowledged the other side’s views, yet still believe that mine is correct which gives me ethos. Source #4 provides background information on environmental sustainability in the U.S. and the role of the EPA which I use in my introduction to introduce the topic. Source #5 is another source I use to challenge the opposing side as it explains how converting to more environmentally sustainable practices will actually create more jobs than it replaces, contrary to popular belief. Overall, I feel good about each of these sources and what they add to my paper.

Research Paper Topics

When trying to decide on a research argument, topics that I have an interest in should obviously be explored. Arguments that involve sports, cultural diversity, and public health are probably more down my alley so my topics deal with these three areas of research.

Question 1: Should universities have such a large portion of funds invested in athletic programs?

This topic is brought up very frequently because of the issues of student debt and quality of education that surround it. Students are upset because numerous schools put money into sports that are drawn from their tuition. There is also the converse argument that the athletic programs are generating a profit, so ultimately it benefits the university.

Motivation: Too often I hear people complain about how easy the student athletes have it. They receive a full scholarship and then just take the easiest classes. I think about it differently. A lot of recruited student athletes desperately need the scholarship. Athletics can be their only way out of poverty. Also, maintaining a balance of commitment to both education and athletics is very difficult. I want to explore this because I also value both athletics and education.

Information and Arguments: I hope to find information and statistics that display the statistics for money placed into athletics programs at major colleges. Ideally, data on the revenue that these schools receive would be very effective in backing my argument on the productivity of emphasis on athletics for schools as a business. Another argument I could include is the idea that placing too much money into athletic programs hinders the educational quality of the university. This cannot be true since there are so many schools that are sport great educational programs as well as athletic programs (Examples include Duke, Stanford, Northwestern, and many more). My major points will probably be the three stated.

 

Question 2: To what extent does race influence opportunity?

This topic is one we hear typically in the debate for equality between men and women, however, there still may be a prevalent disparity between the hiring or acceptance of people of certain races or religions. This is a very touchy topic, but it is still very important because the overall goal for society should be that every individual regardless of race, gender, or religious receives identical opportunities.

Motivation: This topic is important to me because I am a person of color and I am saddened whenever I hear stories of discrimination. As a college student, I want to receive similar opportunities for success as my peers of other races or faiths. The hard work I put in should be rewarded and the same goes for all students.

Information and Arguments: As of now, I don’t know how great the difference is between the races in hiring and such opportunities, but hopefully I can find some data that presents this information and the differences will not be negligible. I could also mix gender into the argument as well, so a total analysis of racial and gender differences could vividly paint the picture of the situation. I would make the argument that people of color perhaps don’t receive identical treatment as other do when it comes to the work force. Additionally, I would argue the reasoning behind this and how certain races are stereo-typically veered towards jobs that ‘suit’ them.

 

Question 3: Should all campuses be smoke free zones?

Smoking whether it be cigarettes or any other drug is harmful for the user, but it can also be detrimental towards those around them. Secondhand smoking is a contributor to health issues. Society is so much more accepting smoking, but it can still have repercussions for people in the proximity. In close packed areas, inhaling smoke from cigarettes can also trigger asthma attacks and other breathing issues. Additionally, smoking can lead to addiction and addiction to anything is usually negative.

Motivation: I am completely against smoking because of how detrimental it is to the human body, but more than that, growing up with asthma made me very conscious of when people were smoking around me. On campus, I see countless people smoking and numerous cigarette butts lying around in the sidewalks. This is bad for the environment as well as public health.

Information and Arguments: The most necessary statistics to pursue this topic would be effects of secondhand smoking on people. This is crucial because the ‘public health’ issue is concerned with the people around the smoker. Additionally, it would be helpful to know about other campuses that have implemented a smoke free policy and how that has changed both the environment and the public health of the school. My key arguments revolve around the consequences of smoking both for the user and the public. As stated before, secondhand smoking is a thing and should be a major concern for everyone, but most importantly those with breathing conditions such as asthma.

Core4: UD Student Health Concerns

A cause that is important to my group, the Core4, is the varying student health concerns that undergraduates all over the country are experiencing, specifically freshmen, including the ones here at UD. While student health concerns range from lack of exercise/poor dieting, to unaddressed mental health concerns, to unsafe-sex practices (and the STDs that may follow), it’s important to educate students from the beginning of their time at college. Many college freshmen are experiencing a time when they are out in the world on their own for the first time, making it a very influential time, which can be positive or negative (depending on who is influencing them). This is an important cause to support because college students, and students in general, are the future of the world. If we do not take time to focus on our health now and the importance of making the healthy choices that we should, we will fail to see the importance of passing that information on to future generations. A lot about who we will become is determined by the health-related choices that we make everyday—and they are everywhere. From what we choose to fuel our bodies with in the dining hall, to the destructive substances that we choose that ultimately hurt us, we are in control. From taking the elevator to taking the stairs in various buildings on campus, we are in control. From using a condom when being sexually active to having unprotected sex, we are in control. That’s why it’s important to educate the person in control, us students, on how to healthfully use that power. A student group that strives to do that here at UD is Healthy HENS. Although it’s a good start, way too many students are continually choosing an unhealthy way of life that affects not only their bodies but their minds too. By supporting the cause of improving the physical health of students, we can potentially have a positive impact on their mental health as well. This is still an important cause to support because although we have the research and the knowledge behind healthful decisions, that information just isn’t getting the exposure that it needs to be. It’s our time, here at UD, to take a stand and address student health concerns more than they are currently being considered.

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