Greek Life and Mental Health Sources

  1. Scott-Sheldon, Lori A. J., Kate B. Carey, and Michael P. Carey. “Health Behavior and College Students: Does Greek Affiliation Matter?” Journal of behavioral medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2008. Web. 28 Apr. 2017. This is a scholarly article written by NIH which is a government organization. This is an incredibly credible source that explores the topic of Greek affiliation from a strictly psychological standpoint.
  2. Chapman Body Matter. pp. 1–47, Chapman Body MatterThis is a source that focuses on women, specifically. This is a longer (47 page) article that really goes in depth about the psychological impacts of sorority involvement. As a more detailed source, it will provide me with a plethora of information and statistics/results from various psychological studies about the impact of joining Greek organizations. It explores both sides of the argument and presents concurrences from various studies that have been done.
  3. Mercuro, Anne, et al. “The Effects of Hazing on Student Self-Esteem: Study of Hazing Practices in Greek Organizations in a State College.” The Effects of Hazing on Student Self-Esteem: Study of Hazing Practices in Greek Organizations in a State College – Ramapo Journal of Law & Society, Ramapo College, 6 Mar. 2014, http://www.ramapo.edu/law-journal/thesis/effects-hazing-student-self-esteem-study-hazing-practices-greek-organizations-state-college/. Accessed 28 Apr. 2017. This source provides a counterargument that discusses, specifically, the psychological effects of hazing on fraternity men.
  4. Bruce, Michelle. “Greek Life Builds Confidence and Success.” The Mu, Monmouth University, 22 Feb. 2011, blogs.monm.edu/mu/2011/02/22/greek-life-builds-confidence-and-success/. Accessed 28 Apr. 2017. This is a source that underscores my argument by discussing a personal account about the positive effects of Greek life.
  5. Donato, Andrew De, and James Thomas. “The Effects of Greek Affiliation on Academic Performance.” https://Sites.duke.edu/Jamesthomas/Files/2015/07/De-Donato-Thomas-Greek-Effects-Draft.pdf, Duke University, 5 July 2015, https://sites.duke.edu/jamesthomas/files/2015/07/De-Donato-Thomas-Greek-Effects-Draft.pdf. Accessed 28 Apr. 2017. This is an article published by Duke University that provides insight from both sides of the argument.

An important note to take into account when researching sources for a paper is to  make sure the sources are credible by filtering them by top-level domain. I did not utilize any sources that were not either “.edu”, “.gov”, or “.org” because then I would not be able to tell whether or not they were written by a reliable author with valid information about the subject on hand. I also made sure to include a variety of sources, including a personal account written on a university blog. However, while looking up sources to use, I found that the greatest proportion of reliable, relevant sources I chose to include came from universities that had done previous research about the impact of Greek life on mental health in order to provide prospective participants with conducive information that could influence their choice as to whether they decide to join or to opt out. As for the information, I included sources that argued both sides. One counterargument source was one that discussed hazing in fraternities and some negative mental impacts it may have such as PTSD, extremely out of range stress and anxiety levels, and an overall prolonged state of fear. On the other hand,  I mainly included sources to back up my thesis that also provided evidence for the argument that joining Greek life has an overall positive impact on mental health.

Girl Up! (Team Amigas)

Girl Up is a club dedicated to raising awareness and funds for girls education in developing countries. In high school, I was a member of a local chapter of the club, and I was given the opportunity to attend the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C. From all of these experiences, I gained a lot of knowledge about issues related to girls’ education in developing countries. I learned that when women are included in the workforce, the economy of a developing country improves significantly. Furthermore, giving girls official birth certificates allows them to be enrolled in schools. Not only a national movement, this movement is important to the U.S. specifically. Former First Lady Michelle Obama started a campaign called Let Girls Learn related to the movement. As a result of the efforts of Let Girls Learn and Girl Up members and activists, the U.S. Congress passed the Girls Count Act. This law helps ensure that girls in developing countries are registered at birth.

On the other hand, the students at the University of Delaware do not seem as motivated about this movement as other movements. There are not many clubs centered around promoting education in developing regions. Instead of looking at this as a negative, we can use it as motivation to encourage students to gather together to support this movement. Furthermore, this cause is easy to support because fundraisers are easy to plan. Organizations such as Girl Up take the money raised by fundraisers and do the grassroots work themselves, making it easy for anyone, anywhere to get involved. Lastly, as college students, we understand the importance of getting a quality education. Therefore, we are motivated to raise money and awareness for education in places where education is lacking. In summary, my group should focus on the movement for bringing education opportunities to girls in third-world countries because the University of Delaware does not have many similar clubs, it is easy to support, and it is relatable for college students.

Mapping the Movement: Campus Sexual Assault

Now that I’ve started to build my own website on WordPress, I’ve thought a lot about what an online platform means for the movement against campus sexual assault. One benefit of creating an online platform for this movement is that online platforms are accessible to everyone who has some sort of access to the internet, and are therefore an effective way of publicizing information in a fast and affordable manner. Another benefit of using an online platform for this movement in particular is that it heavily relies on the personal stories of sexual assault victims as well as statistics related to sexual assault, which can both be incorporated in a website format. These stories and statistics both serve as powerful tools in making an impact on readers. The personal stories cause readers to feel compassion for victims, causing readers to want to get involved within the movement in some way. The statistics, on the other hand, provide a certain shock factor for readers. For instance, reading that over one in ten (11.2%) college students experience sexual assault may cause some readers to feel enraged by such high levels of assault, and, as a result, make it an issue personal to them on an emotional level. I plan on using a variety of media sources, including videos of campus protests, graphic representations of statistics, and lots of images on each page in order to make my website an interactive experience for readers. I also plan on organizing my website into distinct pages (i.e. problem, solution, protests, resources) in order to make navigating through the site as easy as possible. Overall, I’m looking forward to the challenge of creating my own website for the movement against campus sexual assault as it’s an issue I feel very passionate about.

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