Sources

Bibliography

Billak, Bonnie. “Second Language Acquisition at the Early Childhood Level: a 5-Year Longitudinal Case Study of Pre-Kindergarten Through First-Grade Students.” Tesol Journal. 4.4 (2013): 674-696. Print.

Kuo, Li-Jen, Gloria Ramirez, Marin S. de, Tae-Jin Kim, and Melike Unal-Gezer. “Bilingualism and Morphological Awareness: a Study with Children from General Education and Spanish-English Dual Language Programs.” Educational Psychology. 37.2 (2016): 94-111. Print.

Peçenek, Dilek. “A Longitudinal Study of Two Boys’ Experiences of Acquiring Italian As a Second Language: the Influence of Age.” International Journal of Bilingualism. 15.3 (2011): 268-290. Print.

Sawyer, Brook E, Patricia H. Manz, and Kristin A. Martin. “Supporting Preschool Dual Language Learners: Parents’ and Teachers’ Beliefs About Language Development and Collaboration.” Early Child Development and Care. (2016): 1-20. Print.

My first source by BIllak called “Second Language Acquisition at the Early Childhood Level: a 5-Year Longitudinal Case Study of Pre-Kindergarten through First-Grade Students” strongly supports my first argument that teaching Spanish to students early in their education helps with their brain development. Since it follows students through the years in question it provides first hand statistical and categorical evidence for the argument about the benefits of Spanish education.

My second source by Kou called “Bilingualism and Morphological Awareness: a Study with Children from General Education and Spanish-English Dual Language Programs” supports the argument that teaching Spanish to students early in their education helps with their brain development. It delves deeper into the science of brain development and how learning two languages can improve it.

My third source by Peçenek called “A Longitudinal Study of Two Boys’ Experiences of Acquiring Italian As a Second Language: the Influence of Age” supports my argument that it is easier to learn a second language at a young age and understanding multiple languages will benefit the children socially. Since the study explores language learning process of two brothers at different ages learning a second language, it shows how the learning process differs between ages. It also shows how the younger and older brothers’ social interactions differed between themselves and natives due to their age of learning their second language.

My fourth source by Sawyer called “Supporting Preschool Dual Language Learners: Parents’ and Teachers’ Beliefs about Language Development and Collaboration” works well with all of my other sources. In this source it goes into the perceptions by educators and parents of kids who are in the dual language program of what learning a language at an early age actually does. This source has a lot of statistics and direct quotations from interviews that I could use throughout my paper in most of my arguments.

Overall, my sources interact well with each other because they all support ideas that are in my thesis but focus on different aspects. The source by Sawyer can draws more on people’s emotions when I use the quotes from the parents and teachers, whereas most of my other sources rely on logic with facts and observations from studies. They build well onto each other, each bringing new information to my paper as a whole.

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One thought on “Sources

  1. To begin, your first and second sources seem very similar. Both deal with how learning Spanish at a young age can improve children’s brain development. It is important to have sources that overlap because the shared statistics and information between them are more reliable pieces of information that will strengthen your argument.

    Not only do you use statistics related to children learning languages, you also delve into what the children’s parents and teachers think about their children and students learning a second language at a young age. This is important because it adds a pathos perspective. Whereas the psychological pros of learning a language at a young age are more logical and fit under the logos category, the parents’ opinions appeal to other parents with young kids.

    In summary, your sources definitely demonstrate how you will make a strong argument in your research paper.

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